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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Barack Obama
President
CSPAN 01/16/2015
Obama: And so that is the kind of dialogue that we're having with these companies. Part of it is a legal issue part of it is a technical question, but overall I’m actually confident that we can balance these imperatives and we shouldn’t feel as if because we’ve just seen such a horrific attack in Paris that suddenly everything should be going by the wayside. We have, unfortunately, this has been a constant backdrop, and I think we will continue to be for any Prime Minister or President for some time to come and we have to make sure that we do not overreact but that we remain vigilant and we are serious about our responsibilities there.
Catherine Herridge
Chief Intelligence Correspondent for FOX News Channel
FOXNEWSW 01/16/2015
Herridge: (they said they want more, not less,) cooperation, also from the big internet providers. Cameron: Not asking for backdoors. We have-We believe in very clear frontdoors through legal process that should help to keep our countries safe and my only argument is that as technology develops, as the world moves on we should try to avoid the safe havens that could otherwise be created for terrorists to talk to each other. Herridge: At one point during that news conference Mr. Obama pointed to the Boston marathon bombing. As you recall one of the brothers was in contact with individuals overseas and had a very sort of robust youtube channel with radical islamic videos. But I would point out that it was not a failure to collect phone records or internet traffic in that particular case. It was a culture failure. The FBI failed to share this information about the Tsarnaev brother with the Boston cops because they didn't feel they had the need to know. So collection would not have made a difference in this particular case.
Mike Hydeck
Morning News Anchor at WUSA 9 News
WUSA 01/16/2015
Hydeck: A new report found there is just no better way to investigate terror suspects other than collecting a lot of data. the national research center released an 85-page report in response to all of that outrage. Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden sparked last year. The President wanted an outside group to see if there was an alternative to bulk data collection. The research group concluded there is not, especially when the NSA wants to investigate the past communication of a new terror suspect.
Jeremy Scahill
Co-Founder, The Intercept
CNNW 01/18/2015
Scahill: Under this administration the war against whistleblowers is, in effect a war against independent journalism. Because what- the message the White House is sending, and I'm glad the James Risen case seems to be going away now, but it should have gone away a long time ago. When you say that we don't have a right to talk to unauthorized sources in government what you're effectively saying is you're only allowed to print official leaks or official statements of the government. It undermines the very idea of a free press. So the U.S. is not absent in this even if it was absent in the literal sense on the ground in Paris. Stelter: I think to get into comparisons to Russia and Egypt makes me nervous. We are much more free here. Scahill: Absolutely. We're much freer and we hold ourselves up as a beacon to the world. There's no comparison with Russia, Turkey and the United States but that doesn't mean we don't have our own war on journalism. Yes, there are different levels of it. But let's don't pretend the United States does not have a hostile posture at times toward journalists who are reporting inconvenient facts.
Barack Obama
President
CNNW 01/19/2015
Blitzer: The "Times" report says the NSA started breaching North Korea's hacking networks back in 2010. The North Koreans have denied hacking Sony but this report says U.S. intelligence agencies were able to track it back so quickly because of the monitoring they had done for at least a few years. Tonight, Kim Jong-un knows how the U.S. government came to point the finger at him for the Sony cyber attack. Obama: We can confirm that North Korea engaged in this attack. Todd: How could the President be so confident just a few weeks after Sony had been hacked? “The New York Times" reports the National Security Agency, America's super-secret eavesdroppers, had infiltrated North Korea's shadowy cyber warriors since 2010. Winkler: It appears that what happened was NSA established footholds in various parts of North Korea's computer infrastructure. They basically established footholds in the Chinese region and they apparently established footholds in the Malaysian region.
Brian Todd
Correspondent for CNN
CNNW 01/19/2015
Todd: The Times reports the NSA began spying on North Korea’s computer networks after becoming increasingly concerned that the regime was bolstering its teams of hackers. Kim Jong-un's government has a secretive hacking team called Bureau 121 and a larger cyberbranch called The Reconnaissance General Bureau commanded by Kim Yong Chol a former bodyguard for Kim's father and grandfather. Rasch: One of the things the North Koreans have done is built up effective and strong teams with skills and training designed simply to break into computers and destroy them and also to gather intelligence. Todd: If the U.S. intelligence community knew Kim's hackers were building their capabilities did anyone in the U.S. government warn Sony that it could be attacked? North Korea had warned as early as last June that it considered Sony's movie "The Interview" an act of war.
David Sanger
New York Times, Chief Washington Correspondent
CNNW 01/19/2015
Sanger: The interesting thing is the North Koreans themselves protested "The Interview" as far back as last June and said if Sony released it it could be an act of war. It's not clear that anybody in the intelligence community connected that with those phishing attacks and denial of service attacks Brian just referred to. In fact in our reporting it showed that when they saw the North Koreans do these they thought it was the ordinary things North Koreans do to many. Although the fact there was so much at Sony you would have thought might have raised some alarm bells. Apparently it didn't. Sony executives tell me they never received any particular warning. Blitzer: So from President Obama on down the FBI director, the NSC Director, everybody else they are convinced 100% this was the work of North Korea although some outside cyberwarfare experts have their doubts right? Sanger: That’s right.
David Sanger
New York Times, Chief Washington Correspondent
CNNW 01/19/2015
Sanger: There are a lot of people with a lot of doubts and that’s because the data that has been made public so far by the United States has to do with things like what i.p. addresses these came from internet protocol addresses, many of which are in China. Many of those experts say you can fake where you're sending a cyberattack from. The difference here is as soon as we saw President Obama make the statements that he made at that news conference on December 19th to accuse North Korea of it and their leadership of it you knew given his own caution on intel issues that he must have seen or heard something. We went out to try to figure out what that was, and what it was of course was just what we reported now.
David Sanger
New York Times, Chief Washington Correspondent
CNNW 01/19/2015
Sanger: The administration is always concerned when you're reporting on national security issues. This story was no different. We try to be very careful when we do these, not only to show our conclusions back to the administration but to hear their concerns and most of the time those concerns are how specific are you about where this computer malware is put because obviously they don't want their adversaries to go after it. In this case I would say the objections were about as they usually are. We try to accommodate them on some issues while still telling this overall story. I think in this case we have struck the balance right. But there are always going to be people who are going to disagree on that. Blitzer: Certain details you withheld? Sanger: Some details we withheld. You will also recall that some details are in the Snowden documents and Der Spiegel, the German magazine published some just this weekend that dealt with North Korea with some specificity as well.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
KCSM 01/20/2015
Goodman: The Guardian meanwhile has published a new report based on Snowden documents which show the NSA's British counterpart, GCHQ, collected the emails of reporters as part of its bulk spying operations. emails from the BBC, Reuters the Guardian, the New York Times, NBC, the Washington Post and the French newspaper Le Monde were saved and shared with staff on the agency's intranet as part of a test exercise. The agency also listed
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